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Lane Cove National Park Wildflowers
Acacias & Myrtles
Here you'll find wattles, eucalypts and tea-trees.

Sydney Green Wattle Sydney Green Wattle
Acacias (family Mimosaceae)

There are an estimated 900 species of Acacia in Australia. And this includes the Australian Floral Emblem, the Golden Wattle (Acacia pycnantha) - which is not endemic to the Sydney region.

There's an estimated 24 Acacia species in the Park.

Index to our Acacia collection -

Coast Myall
Fern-leaved Wattle
Flax-leaved Wattle
Green Cedar Wattle
Heath Wattle
Hedgehog Wattle
Long-leaf Wattle
Myrtle Wattle
Parramatta Green Wattle
Prickly Moses
Rough-leaved Wattle
Sickle Wattle
Silver-stemmed Wattle
Spike Wattle
Sunshine Wattle
Sweet-scented Wattle
Sydney Golden Wattle
Sydney Green Wattle
White Sallow Wattle

Myrtles (family Myrtaceae)

There are over 1,500 species in the mighty Myrtaceae family in Australia. These include Angophoras, Eucalyptus, tea-trees, bottlebrushes and paperbarks.

Members of the family include the tallest flowering tree in the world - the Mountain Ash. Plus cloves, guava, and allspice.

There's an estimated 50 members of the Myrtaceae family in the Park.

Index to our Myrtle collection -

Burgan
Clustered Darwinia
Common Fringe Myrtle
Crimson Bottlebrush
Darwinia biflora
Deane's Tea-tree
Dwarf Apple
Fringed Baeckea
Narrow-leaf Myrtle
Narrow-leaved Bottlebrush
Paperbark Tea-tree
Pink Buttons
Pink Tea-tree
Prickly Tea-tree
Rosy Baeckea
Scribbly Gum
Sydney Red Gum
Tall Baeckea
Tick Bush
Turpentine
Water Gum
Weeping Baeckea
White Mahogany
Woolly Tea-tree

Other attractions of the Lane Cove National Park

Lorna Pass Walking Track
The Lorna Pass Walking Track is in the far north-western corner of the park.

It was named after Lorna Brand who organised the labour for its construction during The Great Depression - when nearly a third of Sydney's work force was unemployed.

Starting from Thornleigh Oval, a loop can be walked that includes Lorna Pass. Signage is not good at present, so best to walk in an anti-clock wise direction taking the left path each time.

Take your time to absorb its tranquility and beauty.

The National Parks and Wildlife website provides details of walking tracks and facilities.


Our Acacia Collection

Sydney Golden Wattle
Sydney Golden Wattle

Acacia longifolia
A single image can not do the Sydney Golden Wattle justice. Being over 4 metres tall, it is a small tree and colours the Sydney bush from late winter well into spring.
White Sallow Wattle
White Sallow Wattle

Acacia floribunda
Similar to the Sydney Golden Wattle, but its pale yellow to white flowers and narrower leaves give it away. Also known as the White Sally Wattle it flowers in late winter.
Spike Wattle
Spike Wattle

Acacia oxycedrus
A small tree, with very sharp broad leaves. Stunning when in flower in early spring.
Parramatta Green Wattle
Parramatta Green Wattle

Acacia parramattensis
Distinguished from similar wattles, by its green bark, the gland at the junction of the branchlets, and 3-4mm long leaflets.
It flowers in summer and is also known as the Parramatta Wattle.
Sydney Green Wattle
Sydney Green Wattle

Acacia decurrens
A beautiful tree. Characterised by its green branches and 10mm long "leaflets".
Sweet-scented Wattle
Sweet-scented Wattle

Acacia suaveolens
Flowering in late winter, it does indeed have a gentle sweet smell.
Sunshine Wattle
Sunshine Wattle

Acacia terminalis
Its flowers are about 12mm in diameter and although mainly flowering in winter, it starts flowering in early autumn and continues to late spring. It is a small tree up to 2 metres in height.
Flax-leaved Wattle
Flax-leaved Wattle

Acacia linifolia
Identified by its narrow leaves and small flowers - which appear in summer and early autumn. This leggy tree has less flowers per flower-head which prevents it from having the yellow spheres of the Sunshine and Silver-stemmed Wattles.
Silver-stemmed Wattle
Silver-stemmed Wattle

Acacia parvipinnula
Flowering in spring, this wattle is identified by its silver-stems, pale yellow flowers and numerous glands.
Rough-leaved Wattle
Rough-leaved Wattle

Acacia hispidula
Identified by its rough ovate leaves. Its flowers are about 10mm in diameter. It is a small tree up to 2 metres in height.
Sickle Wattle
Sickle Wattle

Acacia falcata
Identified by its curved sickle-shaped leaves - the main vein of which is offset towards the top. It flowers in winter.
Myrtle Wattle
Myrtle Wattle

Acacia myrtifolia
Flowering in late winter, it is identified by its red (middle age) branches, and the gland on the inside edge of its leaves. It is also known as the Red-stemmed Wattle.
Long-leaf Wattle
Long-leaf Wattle

Acacia longissima
This small summer flowering tree is also known as the Narrow-leaved Wattle. It can be identified by its narrow and long leaves (typically 2-3mm wide and 15cm long) with a prominent central vein. The flower spikes are 3-4 cm in length.
Coast Myall
Coast Myall

Acacia binervia
Its beautiful silvery-grey curved leaves that have three veins, identifies it.
Its stringy-bark like trunk also helps.
It flowers in late winter/early spring.
Green Cedar Wattle
Green Cedar Wattle

Acacia schinoides
Easily recognised by its flat dull bipinnate leaves that have two or three distinct veins.
There is a gland between the end pair of leaves, and occasionally on the second and third pairs as well.
Fern-leaved Wattle
Fern-leaved Wattle

Acacia filicifolia
Bright yellow flowers in late winter/early spring and its green branches help identify it - plus the jugary glands and 2 or 3 interjugary glands.
Three prickly customers ...

Prickly Moses
Prickly Moses

Acacia ulicifolia
Key attributes -
    most common of these three wattles.
    autumn and winter flowering.
    cream colour flower.
    stipules longer.
    phyllodes (leaves) are broader at base.
    phyllodes often have a gland angle.
Heath Wattle
Heath Wattle

Acacia brownii
Key attributes -
    longer but fewer phyllodes.
    winter and spring flowering.
    creamy-yellow colour flower.
    long needle like phyllodes.
    phyllodes not broader at base.
    phyllodes do not have a gland angle.
Hedgehog Wattle
Hedgehog Wattle

Acacia echinula
Key attributes -
    phyllodes abruptly taper to point.
    winter and spring flowering.
    bright yellow colour flower.
    branches hairy.
    peduncle (stalk) stout.


Our Myrtles (family Myrtaceae) Collection

Gums - genera Eucalyptus, Angophora, Tristaniopsis and Syncarpia.
Species of these genera are all loosely called gums, and dominate the landscapes in which they occur.

Dwarf Apple
Dwarf Apple

Angophora hispida
The beauty of this stunning tree is that it is small - only 5 or so metres in height - thus allowing close examination of its incredible buds and flowers.
Angophoras don't have caps on their gumnuts.
Sydney Red Gum
Sydney Red Gum

Angophora costata
This gangling red giant can be up to 30 metres tall. It is best seen in late summer after it has shed its bark.
Also see the Sulphur-crested Cockatoos web page.
Water Gum
Water Gum

Tristaniopsis laurina
This summer flowering medium size tree is found in gullies and next to creeks.
Its botanical name comes from its laurel like leaves.
Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum

Eucalyptus haemastoma
Identified by its signature scribbly - see the next image. It flowers in autumn - compared to the other scribbly gums (E. racemosa and E. sclerophylla) which are spring and summer flowering respectively.
Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum

Eucalyptus haemastoma
Scribbly Gums are named after the scribbles on the bark - which are made by the larva of a very small moth.
White Mahogany
White Mahogany

Eucalyptus acmenoides
Distinguished from other stringybarks by its "wine glass" cap and discolorous leaves - leaves darker on one side than the other. It flowers in Spring and Summer and grows to over 30m.
Turpentine
Turpentine

Syncarpia glomulifera
Found along the NSW and Queensland coast and ranges. It can grow to 25 metres. Turpentine piles were used in the wharves of Sydney and London.
Bottlebrush - Callistemon genus

The 30 bottlebrush species are only found in Australia - with 19 in NSW and 9 in the greater Sydney area.

Crimson Bottlebrush
Crimson Bottlebrush

Callistemon citrinus
One of the more common bottlebrushes, it flowers in late spring. Its crushed leaves give a distinctive citrusy fragrance.
Narrow-leaved Bottlebrush image pb040350 160
Narrow-leaved Bottlebrush

Callistemon linearis
Also flowering in late spring, this bottlebrush is best identified by its narrow (1-3mm) long leaves.

Tea-tree - Leptospermum genus

The Tea-tree was so named because it was used by Captain Cook's sailors as a tea substitute. The species used was Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium).

Tea-tree oil is actually from Melaleuca alternifolia which is only found in Northern NSW.

Paperbark Tea-tree
Paperbark Tea-tree

Leptospermum trinervium
This small tree is the most common tea-tree species in the Park. It is easily identified by its paperbark trunk and woolly buds.
Woolly Tea-tree
Woolly Tea-tree

Leptospermum grandifolium
A shrub to small tree, it is also a common species. It has a smooth trunk and the under-surface of its leaves is woolly.
Also called the Mountain Tea-tree.
Deane's Tea-tree
Deane's Tea-tree

Leptospermum deanei
This is an uncommon species and is classed as vulnerable. It is only found in the Sydney area and is identified by its slender (1-2mm wide) leaves.
Pink Tea-tree
Pink Tea-tree

Leptospermum squarrosum
More commonly autumn flowering with pink flowers, this white flowering plant was found in spring. The 20mm wide "pink" flowers and sepals identify it.
It is also called the Peach Blossom Tea-tree.
Prickly Tea-tree
Prickly Tea-tree

Leptospermum juniperinum
This shrub is easily identified by its prickly leaves - its new growth is not prickly. The leaves and flowers are held very tightly to the branches.
Kunzea flower
Kunzea genus

Distinguished from the Leptospermum (tea tree) genus by its long filaments and style - the latter coming from the centre of the flower.


Tick Bush
Tick Bush

Kunzea ambigua
Flowering in late spring, the flowers are about 7mm from petal-tip to petal-tip.
It is also called the White Kunzea.
Pink Buttons
Pink Buttons

Kunzea capitata
Flowering in spring, the flower ball has a diameter of about 15mm - but its pink colour identifies it.
It is also called the Heath Kunzea.
Burgan
Burgan

Kunzea ericoides
Similar flower to the White Kunzea, but its 20mm long leaves and the 5mm pedicel (stalk) clearly identifies it. Burgan is a Koori word.
Darwinia genus

The unique shape of the flowers identifies this genus.
Named after Charles Darwin's grandfather - Erasmus Darwin.

Darwinia biflora
Darwinia biflora

Darwinia biflora
There is no common name for this small inconspicuous plant - I suggest "Twin Darwinia".
It is identified by its pair of green flowers with red bracteoles. The corolla (tube) is 7mm long; the style 10mm.
It is classified as vulnerable and is only found in the northern and north-western suburbs of Sydney.
Clustered Darwinia
Clustered Darwinia

Darwinia fascicularis
Identified by the many flowers in each "cluster". They start off white in colour and become red.
Also called the Cluttered Scent Myrtle due to the aroma given off by the leaves.
It flowers in late winter and early spring.

Tall Baeckea leaves
Babingtonia, Baeckea and Euryomyrtus genera

Just as all the native plants in Australia are yet to be described, the classification of identified plants is occasionally refined.

In the last few years several Baeckea species have been transferred to the Babingtonia or Euryomyrtus genera.

This explains why their common name refers to the former genus.

The leaves of these three genera are opposite - which differentiates them from Tea-trees (the Leptospermum genus).


Weeping Baeckea
Weeping Baeckea

Baeckea linifolia
The 5mm wide flowers appear in summer. The shrub is up to 2 metres high and its weeping form distinguishes it.
Fringed Baeckea
Fringed Baeckea

Baeckea diosmifolia
This small scrub can be identified by its tiny teeth on the 3mm long leaves. Its flowers are 6mm across, and commonly have 8 stamens.
Rosy Baeckea
Rosy Baeckea

Euryomyrtus ramosissima
This tiny flower (4mm wide) looks like a tea-tree flower - and they do both belong to the Myrtaceae Family.
Narrow-leaf Myrtle
Narrow-leaf Myrtle

Babingtonia densifolia
Formerly called Baeckea densifolia, the flowers of this small shrub are about 7mm across. The stem leaves are appressed, while the leaves at the end of the branches are crowded and curved at the tip.
Tall Baeckea
Tall Baeckea

Babingtonia pluriflora
This summer flowering plant is identified by its long stalks that branch out to bear several flowers. Plus the leaves being in pairs and opposite each other.
It was formerly part of the Baeckea virgata complex - and thus its common name.

Other genera of the family Myrtaceae

Common Fringe Myrtle
Common Fringe Myrtle

Calytrix tetragona
This plant is found across the southern states of Australia and into Queensland. The thread coming from the tip of each of the five sepals is known as an awn. The petals are about 5mm in length. Apparently, it is easily grown.
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