Waratah Software logo
(click images to see larger ones)
Lane Cove National Park Wildflowers
Boronias, Guinea Flowers & Heaths
Family Rutaceae, Genus Hibbertia & the Family Ericaceae

NSW Coral HeathNSW Coral Heath
Family Rutaceae includes the Boronia, Correa, Leionema, Phebalium and Zieria, and also includes citrus fruit.

A principal factor in identifying Guinea Flowers is the number and position of their stamens and carpels. For example the Blue Mountains Guinea Flower has about 16 yellow stamens and two green carpels.

The Family Epacridaceae (Southern Heaths) have recently been absorbed into the Family Ericaceae (Northern Heaths).
Northern Heaths includes Rhododendrons and Azaleas.

Index to our collection -

Family Rutaceae
Common Correa
Hairy Zieria
Pale Pink Boronia
Pinnate Boronia
Stiff Boronia
Sandfly Zieria
Sydney Boronia
Toothed Phebalium
Guinea Flowers
Blue Mountains Guinea Flower
Bundled Guinea Flower
Golden Guinea Flower
Rough Guinea Flower
Showy Guinea Flower
Twining Guinea Flower
Heaths
Coral Heath
Daphne Heath
Lance Beard-heath
Leucopogon appressus
Leucopogon setiger
Native Fuchsia
Necklace Heath
NSW Coral Heath
Pink Bearded Heath
Prickly Bearded Heath
Prickly Broom Heath
Red Five Corners
Small-leaved White Beard
Snow Wreath
White Beard

Other attractions of the Lane Cove National Park

Pacific Black Duck
The Pacific Black Duck is one of several water birds that inhabit the water courses of the Park. Other water birds include -

the Australian Wood Duck
Black Swan
Eurasian Coot
White-faced Heron.

Images of these birds are shown on our Birds web page.

The principal watercourse in the Park is the Lane Cove River. It flows into the Parramatta River at Greenwich Point. The Parramatta River "becomes" Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour).

Tributaries of the Lane Cove River in the Park include Terrys Creek and Devlins Creek.


Our Collection

Family Rutaceae

Boronias - as with other members of the family, the fragrance comes from the oil in the leaves.

Pale Pink Boronia
Pale Pink Boronia

Boronia floribunda
Sometimes confused with the Pinnate Boronia, but the Pale Pink Boronia has broader leaves with a point, usually pale pink flowers and a larger stigma.
Pinnate Boronia
Pinnate Boronia

Boronia pinnata
A mass of flowers in spring. The delightful fragrance comes from the aromatic leaves.
Sydney Boronia
Sydney Boronia

Boronia ledifolia
Flowering in late winter through spring, its stems are a rusty colour. It is also known as the Ledum Boronia.
Stiff Boronia
Stiff Boronia

Boronia rigens
A small inconspicuous little plant. Its 8 stamens help identify it as a Boronia - otherwise it looks like the Zierias below.
Its trifoliate leaves are up to 10mm long and its flowers, which seemed to be in bud for ages, are less than 5mm across.

Zierias - distinguished from Boronias by their 4 stamens - Boronias have 8.

Hairy Zieria
Hairy Zieria

Zieria pilosa
A small inconspicuous plant bearing 10mm long flowers in spring. Crushed leaves have a lemony fragrance.
Sandfly Zieria
Sandfly Zieria

Zieria smithii
This shrub can be over 2 metres tall, and is found in sheltered gullies. The oil in its leaves repels insects - and thus its name.

Other Rutaceae family members

Toothed Phebalium
Toothed Phebalium

Leionema dentatum
Flowering in late winter, this small tree is named after its tiny teeth along the leaves.
Its flowers are 10mm across.
Common Correa image p8120076 94
Common Correa

Correa reflexa var. reflexa
Its opposite leaves, acorn like cap, and bell shaped 4cm long flowers clearly identify this delightful plant.
Common Correa
Common Correa
(green variant)
Correa reflexa var. reflexa
Although more commonly shown as red and green, the many plants I have found in the Park are mainly the all green variant.

Guinea Flowers - genera Hibbertia, family Dilleniaceae

Bundled Guinea Flower
Bundled Guinea Flower

Hibbertia fasciculata
Identified by its "round" leaves, and having 10 ± 2 stamens that surround 3 carpels.
It is a small shrub whose flowers are about 8mm wide, and leaves about 6mm in length.
Golden Guinea Flower
Golden Guinea Flower

Hibbertia scandens
This is the best known Guinea Flower. It is a climber and is recognised by its large flower - up to 10cm wide. It has more than 30 stamens and 3-7 carpels.
Rough Guinea Flower
Rough Guinea Flower

Hibbertia aspera
Named after its rough leaves, this small Guinea Flower has 4-6 stamens. Its leaves are heavily recurved.
Twining Guinea Flower
Twining Guinea Flower

Hibbertia dentata
Flowering from late winter, this climber's 30mm wide flowers have over 30 stamen that surround 3 carpels.
It is distinguished from the Golden Guinea Flower by its slightly "teethed" leaves - and thus its botanical name.
Showy Guinea Flower
Showy Guinea Flower

Hibbertia linearis
This guinea Flower is identified by its recurved leaves, being hairless, and having around 20 ± 5 stamens that surround 3 carpels.
It is a medium sized shrub and flowers in spring.
Blue Mountains Guinea Flower
Blue Mountains Guinea Flower

Hibbertia bracteata
Restricted to the Sydney basin and Blue Mountains, this Guinea Flower is identified by its dark green shiny broad pointed leaves, and its approx. 16 stamens - which are to one side of 2 carpels. The flower is about 20mm wide. Its very hairy tan sepals also identifies it.

Heaths - family Ericaceae

Epacris genus

NSW Coral Heath
NSW Coral Heath

Epacris pulchella
Flowering from late summer to early Autumn with usually white flowers, but occasionally light pink, characterise this stunning plant.
Here's another image.
Coral Heath
Coral Heath

Epacris microphylla
Flowering in spring, it has tightly grouped 3mm wide flowers that cover the erect branch.
Native Fuchsia
Native Fuchsia

Epacris longiflora
The inch (2.5cm) long flowers appear in winter and spring.
It is also known as the Fuchsia Heath.

Leucopogon genus

Prickly Bearded Heath
Prickly Bearded Heath

Leucopogon juniperinus
A prickly customer indeed. Identified by its 8mm long translucent greeny white tubular flowers.
Leucopogon appressus
Leucopogon appressus

Leucopogon appressus
Its lance like leaves that are appressed to the stems identifies this heath.
It flowers in late summer into autumn.
Bearded Heath
Pink Bearded Heath

Leucopogon ericoides
The slight pink tinge provides its name.
It flowers in late winter, its fuzzy tiny flowers are less than 5mm wide. It is differentiated from others in the genus by its leaves and its flowers not having the translucency of L. juniperinus.
Here's another image.
Small-leaved White Beard
Small-leaved White Beard

Leucopogon microphyllus
The tiny "fluffy" flowers are about 4mm wide. Although mainly flowering in spring, it has some flowers throughout the year. Its leaves help identify it.
Here's another image.
Lance Beard-heath
Lance Beard-heath

Leucopogon lanceolatus
The radiating lance shaped leaves with 3 to 5 prominent veins identifies this plant, as does the spikes of flowers in spring.
White Heath
White Beard

Leucopogon amplexicaulis
This plant is easily identified by its heart shaped, recurved, fringed leaves that surround the stem.
The 5mm wide flowers appear in late winter.
Leucopogon setiger
Leucopogon setiger

Leucopogon setiger
Characterised by the long peduncles (flower stalks) which bear several flowers.
Flowering in late winter, it is an uncommon species in the Park.

Styphelia genus

Red Five Corners
Red Five Corners

Styphelia tubiflora
Its red flowers make this plant stand out in winter. The flowers are 20mm long, and the pointy leaves are sharp.
Here's another image.
Red Five Corners
Red Five Corners
(clear variant)
Styphelia tubiflora
A single plant in a group of normal red flowered Five Corners - its translucent colour stood out.

other Heath genera

Snow Wreath
Snow Wreath

Woollsia pungens
Flowering in late winter, its 10mm wide flowers have a strong fragrance.
Also recognised by the ripples on its petals.
Necklace Heath
Necklace Heath

Dracophyllum secundum
This spring flowering heath is easily recognised by its red flower stem and leaves. Each flower is about 10mm in length.
Prickly Broom Heath
Prickly Broom Heath

Monotoca scoparia
Identified by the veins under its pointed leaves and that its autumn flowers don't have a beard like the Leucopogons
.
Daphne Heath
Daphne Heath

Brachyloma daphnoides
Its name is due to the fragrance of the flowers. The red tip of its leaves helps identify it.
 Copyright © 2017  Waratah Software